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the unemployment rate is too high at the moment. so the head of the u.s. federal reserve has defended the central bank's monetary stimulus package. this has eased concerns fed officials would cut short their asset-buying program. chairman ben bernanke on tuesday presented his semi-annual report to the senate. he acknowledged bold monetary easing could cause inflationut stressedhe mit of the licy. >> we do not see potential cost to the increased risk taking in some financial markets as outweighing the benefits of promoting a strong economic recovery and more rapid job creation. >> bernanke also warned imminent spending cuts could put the brakes on recovery if they take effect on march 1st. he urged republicans and democrats to set aside their differences to find a solution. now, bernanke also said he understood japanese prime minister shinzo abe's push for heaid abe i trying to boost the economy and is not manipulating exchange rates to devalue the yen. >>> u.s. president barack obama wants republicans to compromise before budget cuts take effect on friday. >> there are too many republicans in con
for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan ot. entllysome kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? o we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you know, this is a very, very bad way to
from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. i'm sorry, there's something on your nose. it's a white...thing. he's my brother and he's no liar, so back off, francine. great...cut! (laughter) i know you like playing games, and i always try to do my best. so go to pbskidsgo.org and play awesome electric company games and earn points r your favorite person, like me, hector. i mean, i'm your favorite, right? so what are you waiting for? >> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. federal reserve boss ben bernanke shows signs that the central bank will continue buying government bonds to help support the economy. the housing recovery continues building ground, with new home sales and home prices hitting multi-year highs. and the banking business may have fewer employees, but wall street bonuses are up, rising nearly 10% on average. tonight, a closer look at banking jobs. that and more tonight on nbr! the federal reserve strategy of buying government bonds to help the economy will continue.
to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and therefore less secure nation. >> i'm to the giving up on democracy. i don't know what the alternative is. if you say a democratic government can't solve this problem, then you are saying we need a dictatorship? i dot think s. >> rose: i'm pleased to have jay fishman at this table for the first time, welcome. >> thank you, charlie s so good to be here. >> rose: so just pick up on overdraft, what's the urgency? and why hasn't the government, washington responded to something that most people agree stands in the way of america's economic growth and health? >> so let me size up the issue in just a few numbers. this discussion has been lots of words, precious few numbers. the baby boom generation of which i'm a member is moving in exorrably into that 65 and older time frame, between 2000 and 2010, 55 to 64, that population group gr
days $85 billion in aubling spending cuts will begin to ripple through the u.s. onomy. the impact will be felt across society from education, to medical care to national defense. the sequester deadline imposed in the summer of 2011 was intended to sharpern the government's focus on the fat debt. president obama pushed for a last minute compromise to lessen the economic damage. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured the uncertainty is already having an effect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> these cut does not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> rose: steve rattner has had a distinguished career in journalism, business and government, instrumental in turning around the automobile industry, and currently chairman of advisors and the economic analyst for msnbc's morning joses and a regular contributer to the "new york times" and financial times. so i'm pleased to have
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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